Deprived areas worse off under new cash allocations for schools

Olivia Rook
Monday, October 14, 2019

Analysis by the School Cuts coalition shows cuts averaging £382 per pupil for primary schools in the most deprived intakes, compared with £125 a year in the least deprived intakes.

The Department for Education has said that areas with high proportions of students from a disadvantaged background will continue to receive the highest levels of funding.
The Department for Education has said that areas with high proportions of students from a disadvantaged background will continue to receive the highest levels of funding.

More than 16,500 schools will lose out under new Government cash allocations, according to research by leading teaching unions.

The School Cuts coalition, which includes the National Education Union (NEU) and Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), has launched an interactive map of England’s schools, which shows how primary and secondary schools will be affected by the Government’s announcement.

The Government said that figures released on Friday 11 October show every secondary school will receive a minimum of £5,000 per pupil next year, and every primary school will receive a minimum of £4,000 from 2021-22. They also said the biggest increases in funding will go to schools that need it the most.

The coalition has disputed the Government’s statement about funding in deprived areas; their analysis shows cuts averaging £382 per pupil for primary schools in the most deprived intakes, compared with £125 a year in the least deprived intakes.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of ASCL, said: ‘We are not being churlish, we are just stating the facts. The extra money for schools is not enough to reverse the cuts and the funding crisis is not over.

‘In fact, many schools will have to make further cuts next year because they are receiving only an inflationary increase and school costs are rising above inflation. We need an uplift for all schools which restores funding levels to where they were before the cuts began to bite and which keeps pace with costs.’

Kevin Courtney, joint general secretary of NEU, added: ‘Parents, teachers and school leaders need no lectures on the impact of the school funding crisis. And children who started school in 2015 will have seen no relief by 2021 in 83 per cent of schools – their whole school career has been blighted. It is galling for everyone in the education community that the Government continues to underfund and under-deliver on their responsibility to the nation’s schools.’

Responding to the coalition’s analysis, the Department for Education has said that areas with high proportions of students from a disadvantaged background will continue to receive the highest levels of funding. It also stated that £2.4bn is being invested through the Pupil Premium – a fund given to schools to improve the attainment of disadvantaged children.

 

 

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